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20121211
20121211
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. bill yes indeed. president obama in michigan, joining the fight against the right-to-work legislation. good morning everybody. it is tuesday december 11. you're watching the full-court press here on current tv and you're listening to it on your local talk radio station and on sirius x.m. this hour. welcome, welcome, welcome to the program. here we go as we tackle the issues of the day here on this tuesday, december 11. and, of course, give. >> chance to get involved in the conversation. not just to hear what's going on but to talk about what it means to you. you can follow us on twitter at bpshow and we'll read a lot of your comments on the air. you can follow us on facebook. facebook.com/billpressshow. you can give us a call at 1-866-55-press and you can join the chat room yourself and talk to other listeners and viewers to the program this morning across the nation. go to current.com. follow the click to the chat room and you are in. you're look good this morning. good to have you on board with te
point, bracing for protests. thousands battling over michigan's right to work. will the governor reconsider the controversial measure. >>> and president obama and house speaker boehner mum on fiscal cliff negotiations. and a sign that a deal could be near. >>> new world order, the economy growing at an enormous rate in china, and in a few years it will surpass the u.s. what it means, coming up. >>> dozens of homes damaged in the south, ripping off roofs and damaging trees. more to come. stamp watch, straight ahead. >>> lots to talk about this morning. the next two hours, we'll talk with steve israel. jeff sessions, sandy levin, rahm emanuel and businessman javier paolomarez, ed burns, frankie monday easy, and chuck leavell. "starting point" begins right now. welcome, everybody. "starting point" this morning, angry, united. bracing for protests in michigan as the state is poised to become the most unionized right to work state. as many as 10,000 unionized workers expected at the state capitol to voice their disapproval of the measure. some of them teachers, two detroit area school
at michigan state house. there's a vote from the house that has passed the right to work bill. want to bring in alison kosik for the latest. this is controversial, allison. how are people responding? >> reporter: there's not much response here. what's going on inside the capitol is this. two votes happening in the house, one passed as you said, 51-48. that is the public union portion of the right-to-work law. that passed the house. now with the house is going to do is vote on a senate bill on private unions and that is also expected to pass. once that does if it does, it's expected that measure will head to governor rick snider's desk where he is expected to sign it. i did talk to protesters here, i let them know that the first part did pass. one teacher i talked with who came out today said they're not listening to us standing out here. at the same time another person in favor of the measure came up to me and said, what's the latest? i said the first measure passed and she jumped up and said, yeah. you are feeling the tension start to happen here. one thing that happened 40 minutes ago a te
open between the speaker and the president. president obama took his argument to michigan yesterday, where he also weighed in on a right to work all that's making its way through the state today -- a right to work law. do you support or oppose those laws? michigan will become the 24th state to have one. the phone lines are open. also, send us a tweet or a facebook post, or send us an e- mail. here's what the president said yesterday in michigan. [video clip] >> these right to work law don't have to do with economics. they have everything to do with politics. what they are really talking about is giving you the right to work for less money. [cheers and applause] you only have to look to michigan, where workers were instrumental in reviving the auto industry and to see how unions have helped to build not just a straw upper-middle-class but a stronger america -- stronger middle-class but a stronger america. people and should be focused on the same pink. they should be working to make sure companies like this manufacturer is able to make more great products. that's what they should be f
in michigan, democratic caller. go ahead. >> caller: yes. i have a two-part question. i was wondering, for one, i'm going to be retiring here in another 12 years but i'm not going to have social security until probably the age of 70. i'm 50 now. and i was wondering, right now if i was to lose my job for some unforeseen reason, i will lose my benefits. i have the option, as an employee to keep my benefits at a about $800 cost. but when senators and congressman step out of their position, i'm not mistaken, they still have their insurance for life. and then the second part of the question, that i am posing is, i believe they are going to get a 3% pay raise every year and i have never seen in my lifetime them stop that. i was wondering if that is something could be possibly done? >> host: isabel sawhill. >> guest: i assume what you're talking about is that if you were to lose your job you would lose your benefits, you mean primarily your health care benefits. and you're right. you would lose them. under the affordable care act once it is implemented in 2014, that would enable you to go on an excha
that process. >> quick question on the michigan right to debate. there's one democrat who said today that if this right to work initiative is signed into law, quote, there will be blood. since the president weighed in yesterday and obviously made his feelings known, and has talked about changing the tone here in washington and around the country, do you -- does the white house feel any obligation to tell fellow democrats to debate this issue but debate it in a peaceful and -- >> the president believes in, you know, debate that's civil. i haven't seen those comments and i'm not sure that they mean what some would interrupt them to be -- interpret them to be, i just haven't seen them. the president has always opposed so-called right to work laws. as he said, those laws are generally political and not economic. they're more about the right to earn less pay than they are, you know, helpful to our economy. . he presented his views on that issue. ? when we were asking about the chicago teacher's strike before the election, you said it was a local issue and the president has, quote, n
, smaller business owners. the 10 to go after people from flint, michigan, not so, in tennessee. by a large we're talking to smaller investors, entrepreneurs, business owners. host: what are the members concerns with the fiscal cliff stocks? -- talks? guest: for most small-business owners and senior executives at big companies, the fear is that going over the cliff, even on a technical term, will increase their borrowing costs and will put our economic recovery at risk. most business leaders point to simpson-bowles. they understand that we have to raise revenue and we also have to control spending. they generally like the outlines of the simpson-bowles deal, the principles behind it. spread the cost, protect the most vulnerable, don't disrupt the economic recovery, try to simplify the tax code. they generally support those principles. host: do they believe a recession could happen if we fall off the so called "fiscal cliff?" guest: they do. what we saw last year is business leaders were concerned that washington was not going to come together with a deal. and that it could end badly, but it
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7